(hed) pe – Blackout

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I was no naive at the time. I wanted desperately to like this. The album cover was beautiful. The word ‘blackout’ is pretty cool. The band’s name was badass and made no sense. Best of all, there were supposed to be one of the more Hip-Hop orientated Nu Metal. My previous experience with them was with Only in Amerika, which was good if you ignore how it treated women like the Japanese treated their specimen in Unit 731.

Something about this record felt off, though. Sure, the opening song was great and bizarre with its melodic-yet-aggressive vocals. Everything else lacked the punch, that Nu Metal chutzpah that (hed) pe did better than anyone else. After following them further into their career, the position of this album became clearer. It also explained why Only in Amerika was such a hateful record towards women.

This was their normal record. Apparently, the label pushed them to make this. Making a more radio-friendly record means less profanity, less lyrics about partying and more straight-up rock about the general gloom of life. The fact the record still sounds at home in the Nu Metal speaks volumes about the band’s talent. The label couldn’t crush the party. Even while playing straight, the band is weirder than their peers.

The key to this is the band’s natural talent. On previous albums, it could be said the genre pushed them to great moments. Here, they’re dealing with a duller sound that only talent can lift up. Check that ominous riff in “Dangerous”, that jerky guitar line in “Bury Me” or the frantic bassline in “Flesh and Bone”. Whenever a Nu Metal band normalized their sound, they had no such moments. They kicked ordinary riffs. (hed) pe can still finds unique sounds even when making generic gloom rock.

Jahred’s vocals are, of course, an integral part of the charm. His vocals are just as versatile as last time. He raps a little less, but he still jumps freely from style to style. It sometimes even sounds like there are two vocalists in the band. On “Suck It Up”, his singing voice goes ridiculously low. I talk a lot about the balance between melody and aggression which Nu Metal bands are great at capturing. That song is another perfect example of how it works.

He does sound defanged. The title-track should be an anthem against conformity, about trying to fit in. Jahred doesn’t have the same bravado and conviction that made “Crazy Legs” so thrilling. He just sings. His voice is pretty, but is that what people call ‘inauthentic’? In the previous records, his personality dominated. Here, he’s just an extremely talented vocalist. The only time he sounds like the old times is in “Crazy Life”. That’s no coincidence, since it’s the one song that relies more on rapping and some hedonistic lyrics.

At least he has a beautiful singing voice. On the acoustic, Everlast-esque “Other Side” his voice is so pretty it doesn’t really matter that it must be insincere. If we learned anything from the Lostprophets fiasco is that music’s an act. Jahred’s act may not be the most convincing, but his natural charisma lifts up the already excellent melodies. No one else should perform “Revelations” or “Get Away”. Then again, who really cares about authenticity in Nu Metal? It’s a genre about partying and vague complains about life. Blackout may more serious than their previous album, but the title-track is still a banger.

There’s actually a good side to removing the band’s personality. In later records Jahred came off like a misogynistic rapist. How he didn’t get involved a sex scandal is a mystery to me. In fact, I’m sure he did his sure of sex crimes that just weren’t reported yet. Blackout is unique in the band’s discography. It has all the band’s main talents – the crushing riffs, odd sounds, genre-hopping, versatile vocals – without the obnoxious “Women are evil and I love sex” lyrics. It’s the one (hed) pe album I can listen to without squirming.

Despite defanging and normalizing the sound, the natural talent of this band lead to a strong set of songs. It may lack their unique personality, but then again their personality sometimes got in the way. Everything you need in a Nu Metal record – hooks, loudness, variety are here. Not every record can be as brilliant as (hed) pe’s self-titled, but each of these 13 songs should be on a playlist for a rock party.

3.5 crazy lives out of 5

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Slipknot – All Hope is Gone

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Normalization is the worst thing that could happen to a Nu Metal band. Back in the 00’s everyone whined about bands ‘selling out’, but they were concerned with the band’s image rather than quality. If a band decided to sing more and perhaps tone down the noise, it was wrong because it was accessible. Whether it lead to good music or not didn’t matter. So all the critics going hammer missed out about bands dropping elements, turning their vision more and more narrow.

The 00’s were surreal times, and pretty awesome. You could listen to Lostprophets without feeling guilt and overly serious EDM didn’t dominate the airwaves. A wave of loud rock bands rose, deciding that genres are silly. You can have funky rhythms, rapping, Dream Pop atmospherics and coherent screaming – sometimes all in the same songs. They weren’t afraid of being danceable or loud or poppy. “Eyeless”, a full-on rant with Jungle elements was considered unoriginal. It was unoriginal compared to, what, exactly? Long guitar solos and lyrics against Jesus Christ?

When Disturbed and Papa Roach dropped their quirks, it was a bummer but not too much. They weren’t too good at working with them anyway. Slipknot, however, are the band that suffered the most from the normalization. They didn’t distill their quircks into an accessible sound that still had shades of a unique personality. Korn still sounded out-of-place when they made “Make Me Bad”. Slipknot obviously read all the reviews that whined about how Machine Head does something other than an overly serious Pantera and decided, ‘hey, we’ll do it too!’

Why would anyone want to listen to “Gemataria” over “Eyeless”? What is it about the former that makes it more fun, more aggressive, catchier, more creative, more anything positive? Slipknot was so bizarre in their noisy rants that were somehow friendly to Rock radio. You would expect that the music would still have a shed of personality. If Slipknot makes ordinary music, it should at least sound like they’re playing the genre on their own terms.

Instead, it sounds like a creative band trying desperately not to come off weird, like a dude trying to hide his Slipknot shirt underneath a suit & tie. “All Hope is Gone”‘s chorus breaks into a Hip-Hop beat, and the chorus can be adapted into a Hip-Hop song. Since Corey displayed good rapping skills, nothing prevents him from breaking into a full Rap verse. It would be bolder to end the album with pure Breaks and rapping. The groove that drives it comes less from Pantera, and sounds more like the Funk-influenced ending of Prong’s “Cut-Rate”.

Elsewhere, “This Cold Black” and “Wherein Lies Continue” are more embarrassing examples of how hard Slipknot are trying to fit in. The latter has a slow groove that’s not danceable. It’s only ‘heavy’ in the sense that it’s not pleasant to the ear if your musical vocabulary consists of Backstreet Boys and the one Michael Jackson everyone knows. Imagine a Groove Metal track you’re supposed to brood too, rather than dance to. If you can imagine that, you need not ever listen to the song – or the whole album, actually. You’ll also desperately need something to make you forget this image. The former of these two track is the banding slamming their instruments seriously. There are no fun, catchy lyrics like ‘fuck you all, fuck this world’.

Really, people, why must anger be serious and dramatic? Vulgarity is informal. It mixed so well with Nu Metal because it gave it a lightness, a bouncy fun aspect to the music. Vulgarity makes the anger less serious, and the tracks more akin to venting than making grand philosophical statements involving fear and trembling. “Gematria” is limp and anemic, the band slams but can’t come up with anything truly hard-hitting. Spitting poetry about America being a killing name is so hilarious over these theatrical, brooding metal riffs. “We’ll burn your cities down” is the one highlight of the track, because Slipknot used to sound like they want to burn cities down for the fuck of it. Corey sounds more serious than angry, and you’re only allowed to be serious with Nu Metal if you’re weird enough.

Slipknot could’ve have justified their new, ‘no fun allowed’ approach since they were one of the few Nu Metal bands with an artistic bent. Vol. 3 didn’t suffer from it. In fact, it justified it by having fragile atmospheric ballads like “Danger – Keep Away” and weird noises during party tracks like “Pulse of the Maggots”. Nothing here is as brave and progressive like “Three Nil”, a track that was as angry as it was experimental as in was contemplative. It sees Slipknot utterly unrestrained by either Pop or Metal structures. Corey never once touches the conversational tone of that song, and no song has its unique, ever-changing structure except “Gehenna”. It’s an interesting song, at least, which counts for something in an album so lacking in spark or imagination.

The highlights are only “Psychosocial”, “Vendetta” and “Butcher’s Hook”. They don’t reach the heights of Slipknot’s older material except for “Psychosocial” – a fist-pumping stomper that tries to put a serious face, but still cares more about the party than grand statements. The other songs see Slipknot letting loose for a while. “Vendetta” may seem normal, but not because Slipknot are trying to be normal, but because they felt like kicking a straight-forward rocker. “Butcher’s Hook” sounds more like something out of Vol. 3 and has some fantastic atmospherics. DJ Starscream has always an important rib of Slipknot. His odd sounds made them sound more dangerous than any metal riff can, and the intro to the song is more intense than any Thrash Metal record.

Slipknot deserve so much more. While at first they seemed like they were Nu Metal’s most brutal band, they were also one of its weirdest. Even at their worst they sounded off-kilter and actually dangerous, like a band who can’t contain themselves. On this album Slipknot restrain themselves, and if this doesn’t sound awful to you consider this. “Danger – Keep Away” is an extremely soft ballad where the band jumps into its idea with full conviction. It has no build-up, just pure ambiance and creepy lyrics. Slipknot are unrestrained even in their soft songs. Nothing here sounds as dangerous or intense or authentic as that one. Here, they try to please those morons who whine about Machine Head being unoriginal since they expanded their sound. Such people you don’t want at your party, and you don’t want this album either (except “Psychosocial”, that’s Prong-level of party starting).

2 butchers out of 5

Issues – Headspace

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So far, the Nu Metal revival was great but a little disappointing. We got bands that mined the genre for emotional. It sounds impossible, but there’s beauty in Islander’s “The Sadness of Graves” or Of Mice & Men’s “Another You” that no other band in the style had. Others just knew how to rock. What the revival didn’t have was a band that captured the original weirdness.

Nu Metal was, at its heart, a weird genre. The reason critics and True Metalheads whined about it was because they couldn’t keep up. Bands switched vocal styles and genres but still kept it simple. You don’t hear a song like Slipknot’s “Only One” anymore – a mish-mash of three genres that’s accessible enough to play Tekken to. Issues finally deliver what the revival needed – an album that’s as bizarre as it is catchy.

It was so easy to go the other route. It was so easy to feed the mosh kids what they want, play 100 more breakdowns with the occasional R&B break. Instead we get “The Released”, which explodes with a funky riff, rapped vocals and then towards R&B singing all backed by Djent guitars. The second single “COMA” sounds even more like Periphery remixing a Justin Bieber song. Previous Trancecore band still had some aggression in their vocals, but Carter forgets he’s in a rock band. If I were a Slayer fanboy, I’d be offended.

The problem with mixing genres is getting the balance. Some bands merely add elements – a rap verse here or a bass drop there. The most frustrating ones add so much you can’t ignore, but never enough to break out of their subgenre. In their beginning, Issues’ R&B elements were hard to ignore but were also not enough. “Stringray Affliction” may be brilliant, but it’s a Metalcore song spliced with an R&B outro.

Headspace isn’t completely genreless, but it’s diverse enough to make it only fit ‘Rock’ or ‘Nu Metal’. It’s not even that the band isolates the styles, playing a Djent song and then a Pop song. The songs don’t even switch sections. It’s the method of picking small elements, mixing them and creating a whole song. “The Realest” is the best example of this. Despite mixing Funk, R&B, Djent and Hip-Hop it still sounds like a whole song rather than hopping from one thing to another. What’s more impressive is that these outside influence aren’t filtered. The rapping in “Blue Wall” and “Someone Who Does” is convincing. The two vocalist can produce a Rap record and no one would guess they have a Rock background. It’s also no surprise Carter released a solo record, because he never sounds like a Rock singer imitating Craig David.

As exciting as the sound is, there’s also disappointment. Issues never go full weird. There’s nothing like “Kobrakai” or “Nobody’s Listening”. While the band managed to distill their influence into a coherent sound, they’re afraid of expanding on it. The songs never differ too much from another. “Blue Wall” is feels like the most radical departure here, only because it commits itself fully to brutal slamming. None of the song commits itself to anything, but the band merely plays variations on a sound.

They got hook to back it up, though. The sound isn’t the only attraction here. Issues use their sound to dress up already great hooks. In fact, the album is ridiculosly consistent. The only missteps are, perhaps, “Yung & Dum” which feels too redundant in going on and on about how fun it is to be young. It’s easy to forget there were singles when the songs remain catchy all the way through. They also borrow Periphery’s songcraft. While still relying on choruses, the verses are often different and the songs conclude (“Lost-n-Found” gang vocals are an album highlight). The band doesn’t just wants to have a gimmick or hit singles. They produce actual songs.

Anyone who’s moderately interested in music should hear this. People who like heavy music can use this as a gateway to beautiful melodies. People who love hooks and clean singing can use this as a gateway to harsh vocals. Many will still dislike it. The typical criticism of ‘they have no direction’ and ‘they’re gimmicky’ will surface, but these are just Slayer fans being stupid or Indie fans not knowing how to have fun. It’s the Blue Lines of Rock – an album that mixes genres seamlessly, creating a consistent sound and plenty of great songs.

4 wastes of headspace out of 5

The Nu Metal Revival

It’s sad how the most dynamic genres don’t last for long. Nu Metal’s fate was like Big Beat, and it shared a lot with it. It relied on a synthesis of styles, accessibility, aggression and fun. This is the sort of genre that should’ve kept going, surviving by its ability to always change.

Of course, critics were angry. How dare these bands not spit pseudo-poetry over thrashing guitars about how Jesus is evil? We all agree that Slayer (Ripping apart/Severing flesh/Gouging eyes/Tearing limb from limb) is a lot of fun while Limp Bizkit’s lyrics about rollin’ are just stupid. The critics had their way and Nu Metal was replaced for a while by uber-serious Metalcore that had no sense of melody (Hello there, Killswitch Engage).

Thankfully, times are changing. That Metalcore has now been replaced by a more hedonistic, Pop-influenced version that sometimes borrows ideas from Electronica. While this new version of Metal is still making waves, Nu Metal has also been making a comeback. It’s not a well-publicized one, but it’s a great new addition to the genre. These are some bands that are parts of this revival. I do not include Nu Metal bands that are still active in their genre or re-united. Korn, Slipknot and Coal Chamber are still going on if anyone’s interested.

1. Islander


Of all the bands in this list, Islander sound the most disconnected from the trends. They’re not a Metalcore band who discovered you can do more than breakdowns and screaming. They’re not a band who are Nu Metal by chance – borrowing ideas from distant genres. Islander is a good old-fashioned throwback. They sound like all they know is Nu Metal. There are no Hardcore or Metalcore shades in their music. The ‘rapping’ is more informed by P.O.D.. There are sludgy downtuned riffs. The vocalist jerks from clean singing, to screaming to half-rapped vocals in the wild Patton-esque way. The screaming is also very Nu-Metal-ish, not sticking to one tone but alternating.

What makes Islander different is something that a lot of revival bands share. There’s an emotional depth that the original Nu’ers didn’t have. Slipknot couldn’t make “The Sadness of Graves” or something as beautiful as “Kingdom”. They also stray from the hedonism. Nu Metal was music for an angry youth, but it cherished the youth and hated the idea of growing up. No one would write about how being young is shit. Being young is fun, wild and all that stuff. Even “Counteract” sounds more mature than other anthems about how to defeat the world.

Recommended tracks: Cocount Dracula, Counteract, The Sadness of Graves, Side Effects of Youth, Kingdom

2. Of Mice & Men


Everything this band made before their transition towards Nu Metal is crap. You might find in total 4 good songs on their first two albums. If any band makes Metalcore sounds like it ran out of steam it’s these guys. The screaming was horrible, high-pitched and unpleasant. The guitars just made a lot of noise. There was some good melodies but it was mostly acrobatics. All that noise amounted to nothing.

It’s amazing how good their transition is. Maybe it shouldn’t be, because they had a knack for ballads. Like Islander, Of Mice & Men have an emotional vulnerability to them that makes them sound different than the original style. You can tell from the titles like “Another You”, “Would You Still Be There” and “Glass Hearts”. It works. The main problem with Nu Metal is that it tried to be macho while still talking about sorrows. These songs have a humility and warmth to them. For all the screaming and chugging that “Bones Exposed” has, it’s very tender.

Of Mice & Men’s version of Nu Metal is more limited. They have some atmospherics which may remind you of Deftones, but they borrowed the harsh-clean vocals dynamic and that’s it. They did way with Metalcore structures and made the screaming coherent, which is great. Still, even if they’re not one of the more creative bands they add some of the best melodies the genre has.

Recommended tracks: Would You Still Be There,  Another You, Bones Exposed, Feels Like Forever, Something to Hide

3. Bring Me the Horizon


How come nobody talks about this? Sempiternal isn’t just Nu Metal, it’s one of the best Nu Metal records there is. Sure, there’s pretty much no Hip-Hop or Funk, but Electronics and atmospherics were a big deal too. The album sounds like Mudvayne’s early output the most. It’s artistic rock that’s full of teen angst.

That’s a good thing, of course. It gives every experiment a purpose. The main element of that album is that it does the melodic-aggressive thing. There’s no more alternating between clean and harsh vocals. The best bands always blurred the lines and Horizon does it here. Is the chorus of “Go to Hell” clean or harsh? “Antivist” was a deliberate attempt to make a Nu Metal song, and you can’t get more Nu Metal than asking people to put their middle fingers up.

That’s the Spirit goes in an even more melodic direction, but it has plenty shades of Nu. “Happy Song” has a Hip-Hop beats and the atmospherics and electronica sounds a lot like Linkin Park. Even the blunt lyrics are Nu Metal-ish. The genre’s lyrics were always frank and made things as obvious as they can be. There was never much room for big words or pretense that this is poetry.

Recommended tracks: Happy Song, Go to Hell for Heaven’s Sake, Antivist, Throne, Can You Feel My Heart?

4. King 810


This is the oddest one on the list. King 810 are full of angst like any band, but this time is serious. The band hails from Flint, Michigan which is supposed to be a crime-infested city. The band doesn’t just talk about this life of crime but express the hardship of it. It’s a contrast to the Gangsta Rap, where a life of crime is something to be proud of. For all the songs about how the streets have no mercy, the rappers express more strength than sorrow.

King 810 are tortured over it. The whole thing is the musical version of PTSD from constant robbing and shooting. The band stops like a tank but the screaming is hurt, not powerful. When he screamins he’s going to “Killem All”, he doesn’t sound very happy or excited about it. He sounds hurt because he knows that’s all he can do. It’s a band that’s more suited for listening in darker times. It’s often uncomfortable, but fascinating. If any band on this list deserves to become viral it’s these guys.

The music borrows heavily from Korn and Slipknot. The vocals have those emotional crackles and while there’s a lot of screaming, it’s always coherent and never buries the lyrics. Although Slipknot influence should be obvious, it’s quickly overshadowed by the band’s life. The harsh life of crime informs the sound more than anything.

Recommended tracks: Eyes, Killem All, Fat Around the Heart, Write About Us, Best Nite of My Life

5. My Ticket Home


My favorite on this list. This is the most stereotypical Nu Metal will ever get. The harsh vocals that are pretty comprehensible. The aggressive, groovey riffs that aren’t Groove Metal. The rhythms make it sound like a guest rapper will appear any minute. The vocals are melodic, tender and are a complete opposite to the harsh ones.

You can trace so many elements to other bands. Linkin Park, Korn, Slipknot, RATM, Dry Kill Logic, Deftones – the band borrowed from them all. It didn’t make them sound unoriginal, but made them sound like they understand the genre better than everyone else. They sound like they didn’t just listened to the well-known bands but to every obscure ones, too. Their transition was only informed by Nu Metal but it was informed by a lot of bands.

There are also F-bombs dropped everywhere, which makes it even more fun. “Kick Rocks” is the best fuck-you song the genre ever produced. The guitarist mistakes his guitar for a turntable occasionally. Best of all, it’s both fun and angry. Their album works perfectly whether you need to vent because things are going wrong, or whether you want to throw a metal party. The lyrics are as silly as they are on-point. I first thought this was just a fun Nu Metal throwback, but it’s one of the genre’s defining albums.

Recommended tracks: Keep Alone, Kick Rocks, You All Know Better Than Me, Painfully Bored, Hot Soap

Mudvayne – L.D. 50

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Nu Metal always had its weird side, and Mudvayne are trying to take it to the extreme. “Dig” was an obvious single, but Mudvayne’s quirks are there. The hook is a catchy chant, but behind the chanting the band just beats the sound to the ground. There’s a messiness and intensity to the riffs that doesn’t match other Nu Metal bands. More is going on besides noise or groovey riffs.

The bounce of “Internal Primates Forever” only confirms Mudvayne are on to something special. The “jump!” screaming adds some fun to song that tries so hard to be complex. For all of its shifting part and Patton-esque vocals, it’s a fun rocker. Both of these songs are brilliant because the band sounds like they can do anything and still make it accessible and intense and moshpit-friendly. It’s a more complex but organized version of Slipknot’s early output.

The next two tracks are okay, but it’s hard to find the difference between them. The band had a great sound, but all of their ideas were done in the first two songs and “Under My Skin” which only arrives at the end.

What went wrong? There are interesting moments. The tempo shifts in “Death Blooms” are effective and the band sounds good in a more funky setting. The melodic beginning of “-1” isn’t catchy, but it’s an addition that still contributes and adds contrast. The band never sounds tired.

It’s so boring, though. It’s hard to make a loud album that wants to literally break ground with its anger. Some did it, but not like Mudvayne. Glassjaw had heartbreak that made every song stick out. My Ticket Home’s album was short and catchy. Nine Inch Nails made it an EP. Even Slipknot couldn’t drag this for a whole album. Melody made their music heavier, but they still ran out of steam at the end of Vol. 3.

It’s somewhere around “Cradle” that the album loses all potential of a masterpiece. The song doesn’t end where it should but literally restarts. It exhausts all of its ideas and restarts anyway. Worse, it’s not very different than what came before.

It turns out Mudvayne don’t do much with their intense sound. Most of the songs consist of the vocalist screaming while the band pummels in the back and being loud. Catchy hooks and funky breaks are rare, and they’re always too short and too late to save the song.

The attempt at rapping in “Under My Skin” is a blessing. It doesn’t matter whether the label ‘forced’ them to make it or not. You can actually find traces of Hip-Hop in previous songs, anyway. It’s a lighter, catchier and more organized songs than everything around it. The band finally sounds experimental as they want to be. Being experimental isn’t just removing hooks. It also offers the guitarist to play other riffs besides slow sledgehammers.

L.D. 50 deserves some credit for making interludes sound like a good idea. The interludes scattered around the album (which also steal all the best song titles) connect to the songs, and the weird electronics offers a nice respite from the chaos. “Dig” sounds more effective if you have the build-up of “Monolith”. If only Mudvayne used these electronics to create actual songs. Maybe we could have had a nice contrast of cold electronica and chaothic Nu Metal. There’s some fun to be had here, but it’s a band being ambitious without any idea what to do.

2 doses out of 5