The End of Evangelion

Let’s get rid of the obvious first. The End of Evangelion is inaccessible to anyone who didn’t watch the series. This shouldn’t be a point against the movie, though. There are enough great sequels who needed the first film. The fact this is two episodes smashed together to form a movie has no bearings on its quality.

There are far worse problems here. Evangelion was a brilliant series with a disappointing ending. Instead of using intelligence to lift up its story of saving the world, it went full retard. The deviation is only impressive if you haven’t been to the edge of weird storytelling. It contributed nothing to the series but was just a scattered essay with moving pictures.

The film was supposed to fix that, but sadly it doesn’t. Evangelion was never as deep as people say it is. It attempted subversions, but it lacked a theme to unite it all together. Religious symbolism and psychological portraits do not necessarily mean there’s a grand theme. They are ways to express ideas.

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The problems are already apparent in the beginning. It kicks off into a huge action sequence that lives little room for character development. It also perfectly replicates the intensity that made the TV show so fun.

Nobody talks about how fun the TV show us. The drama was engrossing and the action scenes were beautifully animated. Every metal bending, every hit, every explosion is full of power. The enemies have the unique, Angel-esque design and the scene is clean. The environment is bare, making it easy to follow exactly what’s happening. Michael Bay has a lot to learn from this film.

The film attempts the same psychological-monologue-slideshow thing, and it’s just as unnecessary and messy as in the series. It’s a little better, but the core problem remains.

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Moving to such territory is unnecessary. The story isn’t made for such experimental methods. At its heart, it’s a simple story about saving the world from the Unknown Enemy while realizing that humanity can be its own enemy, too. All you need for this story are characters who are convincing enough.

The monologues just go in circles, bouncing from one subject into another with no ideas concluding or connecting. This technique works in novels, but not so for films. You read novels in your own pace, so you take your own time to digest the word salad.

Movies set their own pace, so Anno is throwing at you images and words in machine-gun velocity. This could still have a chance of being entertaining, but experimental films often have a plot that works well with the method. You couldn’t tell the story of Pi without going full retard. It’s an abstract story at heart that happens only in Max Cohen’s head.

There is something about loneliness and the desire to connect. I heard this before and searched for it in this film. While the conclusion does touch that in a symbolic way that works, everything else was over the place like I remembered. Shinji is a neurotic and angsty teen, but his type of angst isn’t focused on enough. Is he a person who gave up on connecting to people like Mirai Nikki‘s Yukki? Is he an obsessive person who sees everything in absolutes like Max Cohen?

Perhaps I missed something in the series, but nothing here connected to a single theme. It starts to look like Digimon Tamers is an attempt to remake Evangelion with coherency. At least Tamers has a theme and symbols that point to it.

I once read that Anno said Evangelion could mean anything the viewer wants to. If so, then the show is about nothing. This isn’t how vagueness works. A story should not give simple answers, but it still needs to ask questions. Asking questions means it confronts a subject, and it’s not just about anything. Medabots asks whether weapons only lead to destruction, or whether they can be used for fun. The vagueness is in how the series makes strong cases for both viewpoints.

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The film still gets by because of its visuals. Despite the attempts at philosophy, the second part works in the same way the first part. Its epicness is exciting. It’s not as meaningful as before. We get monologues, instead of seeing characters in action but the visuals are still beautiful, and there’s a sense of self-importance that actually makes it fun. It stretches itself so far so just seeing how crazy it will go is entertaining. Despite the philosophizing, the film never forgets it’s a visual medium and that it should take advantage of it.

It’s an interesting addition to the Evangelion canon, but it supports the haters more than the fans. Instead of giving Evangelion a coherent ending, it shows how the series never had a grand theme to begin with. Knowing your limitations is important. If Evangelion stuck to its story of saving the world, it would’ve been fantastic. Still, a scattered but creative mind still has plenty of worthwhile ideas.

3.5 Angels out of 5

 

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Terminator Genisys

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Genisys is far from a return to the glory days of Judgment Day. Expecting any film to live up to it is silly. It’s one of those great films where the people involved probably had no idea how good their stuff is. That’s why James Cameron left the building. He knew he couldn’t handle something this good. Nobody after him understood, either. At least the guys who made Genisys show an understanding of the first films, if not of how to make one.

Although it’s easy to miss because stuff gets blown up, Judgment Day is filled with ideas about the nature of men, machine and weaponry. It’s a one-dimensional story about Raging Against the Machine on the surface, but some people think Fight Club is encouraging rebellion. The films always hinted Skynet wasn’t the real enemy. Skynet isn’t a faceless villain to shoot up. Skynet learns to destroy from the people who created it.

Men are the ones who got obsessed with weapons and violence. They are the ones who solve conflicts with shooting the enemy. There is irony in destroying Skynet with the same methods that made Skynet want to destroy us. In a way, Skynet is the physical embodiment of man’s violent nature.

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The new Fear Factory album shares a title

This is why the machine in these films is almost always represented as weaponry. The actual purpose of the characters in Genisys is to reverse the world to a time before war, so humans would not be born into weaponry and violence (using weaponry and violence). Of course, we cannot truly exist without violence or technology. That’s why we get Terminators on either side. One side thinks the solution to all these problems is to be done away with the world, and one thinks that letting everyone live is the better idea.

This is what Kyle Reese means by ‘because we’re humans’. It sounds a bit cheesy, but the series was always about searching for the alternative to the violent nature of man. The whole ‘challenging fate’ comes into play, too. A deeper discussion of the themes is for another time. What all these paragraphs lead to is the film’s biggest strength and its reason for existance.

It’s not a generic action film with Terminator on the poster to attract audience. All the themes in previous paragraphs surface here. It’s actually far more concerned with the Terminator mythology than its reputation for great action scenes. This means this is the first sequel that understands the greatness of the previous films. It acts like the previous two never existed and goes straight back to talking about fate, weaponry, machines, violence and other deep stuff.

Theoritical knowledge doesn’t always translate to creative skills. The right pieces are all here. Emalia Clark looks exactly like how a military young Sarah Connor would look like and the film has the same color schemes. It may the creators were too busy replicating the atmosphere and feel, they forgot about action scenes.

Slow motion makes a cameo apperance a few times, which is great. Other than that, the action scenes have no intensity to them. A bus flips over and that’s cool. Cars exploding remains beautiful, but the violence doesn’t feel unstoppable or dangerous. People tend to shoot each other and this is where it ends. There is no unique camera movements, or a memorable set piece. There is nothing like the final battle of Judgment Day, which felt like a visualization of a Fear Factory song. It could be the PG-13 rating.

It’s also more plot-heavy. The first films had their moments of humanity because of how straightforward they are. People come from the future to blow stuff up, and then it’s one long chase scene that gives the characters moment to think philosophically. In Genisys, thinks are always happening. There is a tangled web of timelines and people traveling across timelines and robots who can copy others so you’re sure who is who.

Worry not if this sounds like Homestuck. It never reaches that level of bullshit, but it’s unnecessary. Everyone in the film knows technobabble is just cool words, so why use them so much? It was cool the first time, but then people can remember a life they could have lead or things along these lines.

It does connect to the whole ‘challening fate’ thing, but it’s still pointless complicating. The sudden appearance of Skynet at the end also came off as an asspull. The creators missed an opportunity for an alternative climax. Skynet sat somewhere between pure evil and a villain with a drive. By letting him speak, they could develop the opposing worldview. They do it a little, but the climax is concerned with replicating Cameron’s climaxes. Since they don’t have Cameron’s visual skill (or his love for Industrial music which he doesn’t reveal), it’s just two huge guys fighting. Centering the climax around a debate between the heroes and Skynet would have contributed much more to the film’s themes. Showing that Skynet can be defeated with intelligence and not violence would strengthen the film’s conclusion that we don’t have to be this violent. It did work for Vault Dweller in the first Fallout game.

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The album is referenced often in the film

At least Schwarznegger is as good as always. The film will let you know that he’s old, but he also became a fan of Fear Factory. At least I’d like to believe that it was a reference to their album. He still looks great packing a shotgun. He still delivers his line with zero emotion, and that makes him both hilarious and realistic. Any time he’s off-screen everyone looks a bit lost. Actually, even in the old films everyone looks lost while Schwarznegger isn’t on screen. No one could play the Terminator character like he does – just look at all the other Terminators. The Terminator may be his only meaningful performance, but it’s a great. Hopefully he’ll bless with a few films like Commando before he retires.

The film is messy and clumsy, but not lazy. There is a genuine attempt to revive with the myth, using the same themes that defined it. The creators don’t have Cameron’s skill and the soundtrack contains no songs from that fanboy band I kept mentioning in my review. It’s still worth a watch if the myth does anything to you. Some have said the franchise has been played out and they do have points, but Genisys lays ground for someone to pick it up and improve on it. That said, the franchise probably won’t get a second chance if anything after this won’t work.

3 Fear Factory songs out of 5