Arctic Monkeys – Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not

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It’s amazing what cultural differences can do. This was apparently a pretty big deal in the UK. It had something to do with how Pop music dominated the charts, or that it gave a voice to macho dudes who only want to pick up girls in the club (but liked guitars), or that they gained their success via word of mouth. I’m here, listening to it 9 years after it came out. I can tell it’s big, but not really why.

It sounds like it has a mission statement, but what it states is different than everything I heard. You can’t rely on historical context for too long. Eventually there will be a generation who never heard those Pop bands you knocked off the charts. They might even like them. They will care more whether the files they got from iTunes are worth doing air-guitar to or singing along to.

The album is a Dance-Rock album. It’s not about creativity or delivering a message or being weird. It tries to do the same thing Glam Metal, later Nickelback albums and Dance-Punk artists like !!! and Test Icicles do. It wants to throw a party with guitars.

The lyrics are more sophisticated than your average Glam Metal track. They swing from trying too hard to sharp. “Fake Tales” is fantastic. It’s a great attack on people who go on and on how cool other countries are. The irony is, in Israel you can switch “San Fransico” with “London”. This just shows how the message is more than just for the locals.

“You Probably Couldn’t See” is another bomb. Turner makes fun of the guys and how they all change their behavior with hopes of impressing a woman. It describes word-for-word every social situation I’ve seen where there was an attractive female there. Even the guys who claimed they’re not into it were influenced. It’s the best song the album.

While these songs give the impression that the band is a vehicle for Turner’s lyrics, it’s not. They’re just seasoning that makes these songs better, but what drives them are guitar riffs, hooks and hard drums.

Turner is a great vocalist. While he can come off as too smug (Especially on “Still Take You Home” where he’s your typical douchebag who has sex with girls he dislikes) he also easily captures an air of coolness. He sounds both smart and hedonistic, like a person who can have fun at a rock club and later make articulate arguments about the last book he read.

He never drowns out the band. In fact, they often threat to drown him. The playing is so energetic and full of life. “I Bet You Look Good” opens with what sound like Metalcore riffs. The band sounds like it’s dying to slam. On “When the Sun Goes Down” it sounds like Turner is trying to keep up.

What makes the band so good is that they know what they’re doing. This is party rock. It exists to be catchy, energetic, to slam and to sing along to. That’s why the moshpit-friendly sections in “I Bet You Look Good” don’t feel too out of place. It’s impressive how the album never runs out of steam. The last two tracks are slightly weaker, but almost everything before it sticks to the concept and never lets up.

There are a few cuts that try to tone down the noise. Only “Riot Van” succeeds, and it’s a surprising one. It only has Turner and some guitar strumming in the back, but it’s beautiful. It comes right in the middle, the right time for a small break. This is the tracks that they will draw inspiration from in their second breakthrough.

Ignore all the people who talk about what it was like when it first came out. This album still sounds great now. It’s a party rock album where the riffs are energetic, the hooks are catchy and everyone sounds like they’re really into it. It even has some cool lyrics that prevent it from sounding moronic but rarely too smug. It’s everything a party rock album should be.

3.5 fake tales of san francisco out of 5

The Nu Metal Revival

It’s sad how the most dynamic genres don’t last for long. Nu Metal’s fate was like Big Beat, and it shared a lot with it. It relied on a synthesis of styles, accessibility, aggression and fun. This is the sort of genre that should’ve kept going, surviving by its ability to always change.

Of course, critics were angry. How dare these bands not spit pseudo-poetry over thrashing guitars about how Jesus is evil? We all agree that Slayer (Ripping apart/Severing flesh/Gouging eyes/Tearing limb from limb) is a lot of fun while Limp Bizkit’s lyrics about rollin’ are just stupid. The critics had their way and Nu Metal was replaced for a while by uber-serious Metalcore that had no sense of melody (Hello there, Killswitch Engage).

Thankfully, times are changing. That Metalcore has now been replaced by a more hedonistic, Pop-influenced version that sometimes borrows ideas from Electronica. While this new version of Metal is still making waves, Nu Metal has also been making a comeback. It’s not a well-publicized one, but it’s a great new addition to the genre. These are some bands that are parts of this revival. I do not include Nu Metal bands that are still active in their genre or re-united. Korn, Slipknot and Coal Chamber are still going on if anyone’s interested.

1. Islander


Of all the bands in this list, Islander sound the most disconnected from the trends. They’re not a Metalcore band who discovered you can do more than breakdowns and screaming. They’re not a band who are Nu Metal by chance – borrowing ideas from distant genres. Islander is a good old-fashioned throwback. They sound like all they know is Nu Metal. There are no Hardcore or Metalcore shades in their music. The ‘rapping’ is more informed by P.O.D.. There are sludgy downtuned riffs. The vocalist jerks from clean singing, to screaming to half-rapped vocals in the wild Patton-esque way. The screaming is also very Nu-Metal-ish, not sticking to one tone but alternating.

What makes Islander different is something that a lot of revival bands share. There’s an emotional depth that the original Nu’ers didn’t have. Slipknot couldn’t make “The Sadness of Graves” or something as beautiful as “Kingdom”. They also stray from the hedonism. Nu Metal was music for an angry youth, but it cherished the youth and hated the idea of growing up. No one would write about how being young is shit. Being young is fun, wild and all that stuff. Even “Counteract” sounds more mature than other anthems about how to defeat the world.

Recommended tracks: Cocount Dracula, Counteract, The Sadness of Graves, Side Effects of Youth, Kingdom

2. Of Mice & Men


Everything this band made before their transition towards Nu Metal is crap. You might find in total 4 good songs on their first two albums. If any band makes Metalcore sounds like it ran out of steam it’s these guys. The screaming was horrible, high-pitched and unpleasant. The guitars just made a lot of noise. There was some good melodies but it was mostly acrobatics. All that noise amounted to nothing.

It’s amazing how good their transition is. Maybe it shouldn’t be, because they had a knack for ballads. Like Islander, Of Mice & Men have an emotional vulnerability to them that makes them sound different than the original style. You can tell from the titles like “Another You”, “Would You Still Be There” and “Glass Hearts”. It works. The main problem with Nu Metal is that it tried to be macho while still talking about sorrows. These songs have a humility and warmth to them. For all the screaming and chugging that “Bones Exposed” has, it’s very tender.

Of Mice & Men’s version of Nu Metal is more limited. They have some atmospherics which may remind you of Deftones, but they borrowed the harsh-clean vocals dynamic and that’s it. They did way with Metalcore structures and made the screaming coherent, which is great. Still, even if they’re not one of the more creative bands they add some of the best melodies the genre has.

Recommended tracks: Would You Still Be There,  Another You, Bones Exposed, Feels Like Forever, Something to Hide

3. Bring Me the Horizon


How come nobody talks about this? Sempiternal isn’t just Nu Metal, it’s one of the best Nu Metal records there is. Sure, there’s pretty much no Hip-Hop or Funk, but Electronics and atmospherics were a big deal too. The album sounds like Mudvayne’s early output the most. It’s artistic rock that’s full of teen angst.

That’s a good thing, of course. It gives every experiment a purpose. The main element of that album is that it does the melodic-aggressive thing. There’s no more alternating between clean and harsh vocals. The best bands always blurred the lines and Horizon does it here. Is the chorus of “Go to Hell” clean or harsh? “Antivist” was a deliberate attempt to make a Nu Metal song, and you can’t get more Nu Metal than asking people to put their middle fingers up.

That’s the Spirit goes in an even more melodic direction, but it has plenty shades of Nu. “Happy Song” has a Hip-Hop beats and the atmospherics and electronica sounds a lot like Linkin Park. Even the blunt lyrics are Nu Metal-ish. The genre’s lyrics were always frank and made things as obvious as they can be. There was never much room for big words or pretense that this is poetry.

Recommended tracks: Happy Song, Go to Hell for Heaven’s Sake, Antivist, Throne, Can You Feel My Heart?

4. King 810


This is the oddest one on the list. King 810 are full of angst like any band, but this time is serious. The band hails from Flint, Michigan which is supposed to be a crime-infested city. The band doesn’t just talk about this life of crime but express the hardship of it. It’s a contrast to the Gangsta Rap, where a life of crime is something to be proud of. For all the songs about how the streets have no mercy, the rappers express more strength than sorrow.

King 810 are tortured over it. The whole thing is the musical version of PTSD from constant robbing and shooting. The band stops like a tank but the screaming is hurt, not powerful. When he screamins he’s going to “Killem All”, he doesn’t sound very happy or excited about it. He sounds hurt because he knows that’s all he can do. It’s a band that’s more suited for listening in darker times. It’s often uncomfortable, but fascinating. If any band on this list deserves to become viral it’s these guys.

The music borrows heavily from Korn and Slipknot. The vocals have those emotional crackles and while there’s a lot of screaming, it’s always coherent and never buries the lyrics. Although Slipknot influence should be obvious, it’s quickly overshadowed by the band’s life. The harsh life of crime informs the sound more than anything.

Recommended tracks: Eyes, Killem All, Fat Around the Heart, Write About Us, Best Nite of My Life

5. My Ticket Home


My favorite on this list. This is the most stereotypical Nu Metal will ever get. The harsh vocals that are pretty comprehensible. The aggressive, groovey riffs that aren’t Groove Metal. The rhythms make it sound like a guest rapper will appear any minute. The vocals are melodic, tender and are a complete opposite to the harsh ones.

You can trace so many elements to other bands. Linkin Park, Korn, Slipknot, RATM, Dry Kill Logic, Deftones – the band borrowed from them all. It didn’t make them sound unoriginal, but made them sound like they understand the genre better than everyone else. They sound like they didn’t just listened to the well-known bands but to every obscure ones, too. Their transition was only informed by Nu Metal but it was informed by a lot of bands.

There are also F-bombs dropped everywhere, which makes it even more fun. “Kick Rocks” is the best fuck-you song the genre ever produced. The guitarist mistakes his guitar for a turntable occasionally. Best of all, it’s both fun and angry. Their album works perfectly whether you need to vent because things are going wrong, or whether you want to throw a metal party. The lyrics are as silly as they are on-point. I first thought this was just a fun Nu Metal throwback, but it’s one of the genre’s defining albums.

Recommended tracks: Keep Alone, Kick Rocks, You All Know Better Than Me, Painfully Bored, Hot Soap

Slipknot – Slipknot

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I don’t think people understood how weird it is that this album sold so much.

When was the last time such an experimental and almost avant-garde album sold so many records? Yes, I just described Slipknot as ‘avant-garde’. Metalheads describe a lot of Nu Metal as ‘generic’, but being a metalhead means being ignorant of other genres. For an untrained ear, Slipknot is meaningless chaothic noise. If you heard some weird music (Which isn’t limited to Velvet Underground) then this comes off as very experimental.

It’s considered ‘metal’ because it’s aggressive, but in many ways it’s played like an Industrial record. Guitar riffs are not at the front. The songs don’t ride these riffs. They’re just another texture. Among other noises the band adds are creepy samples, Test Dept.-esque metallic clangs and frantic drumming. Then, there’s Corey’s vocals.

Corey sings like an angrier Mike Patton. He does it all – singing, screaming, spoken word, rapping, whispering. His delivery is inspired mainly by Hardcore Punk screaming, as seen on “(sic)” and “Eyeless”. It’s freeform ranting that Patton loves so much. It’s a far cry from death growls, which tend to have a clear rhythm.

All this makes for a wild, experimental record with little single material. “Wait and Bleed” is the only thing that can be played on the radio (and that required an alternative mix). Its reason for popularity is how intense this record is. Slipknot’s weird musical ideas stem not from a desire for creativity, but to vent. When Corey goes “fuck it all” ranting on “Surfacing”, it’s convincing even if it’s a trite expression. That’s why the frantic drumming and all this noise is effective. The drumming is just an extension of Corey’s lyrics and vocals.

Its this blunt anger is also the album’s downfall. Since the band only wants to slam their instruments and rant, there are no deviatons. “Scissors” comes close, but it’s a token, long album closer. None of the above elements are expanded and worked upon. The band drops differnet amounts in different songs, but since the songs all serve the same purpose they all end up as “variation on a theme”.

There are a few songs that expand on the rapping – “No Life”, “Only One” and “Spit It Out”, and they ended up standing out more. Light-heartedness and hedonistic vulgarity are one of Nu Metal’s best assets. It’s the bands that forget this that tend to be the weakest. There’s also “Tattered and Torn”, a song that has more in common with Skinny Puppy than anything else. These slight deviations help lift the album a bit, but it runs out of steam by the time you get to “Diluted” and “Liberate”. You can’t fault the band for this. Songs like “(sic)” are great, but this style gets too tiring. Slipknot knew that, but too bad they later introduced melody in expanse of the weirdness.

For the first five tracks it sounds like Nu Metal’s classic. It should be. It gets why the genre works so well. It’s just as experimental as its vulgar and catchy. Slipknot didn’t have the wealth of ideas that would later make a record like Signifcant Other or (hed) pe. All the same, It’s still a record worth checking out, regardless of how you feel about metal. The metalheads were right. This isn’t really ‘metal’. There’s too much going on here.

3.5 only ones out of 5

Disturbed – Immortalized

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At this point, Disturbed aren’t even trying anymore.

They’re barely trying to impress critics with their ditching of Nu Metal. When Believe first came out, it was pathetic. Disturbed tried hard to impress people by ditching rapping and electronics, as if removing elements from your music is somehow a hard thing to do.

The further they got into their career, the more serious their music became. Disturbed don’t make silly Hard Rock. You get nothing like Drowning Pool’s “One Finger and a Fist”. That’s a vulgar song about not giving a fuck with a half-rapped chorus.

Everything on Immortalized is sung with pseudo-operatic vocals whose sole purpose is to make you take the band seriously. Fun songs have melodies. Pseudo-operatic singing just stretches the syllables instead of letting the melody come through. That’s how bad it is. If Disturbed hoped that their melodies woulde carry through their boring sound, now they don’t even have that. They hope that kids will be impressed by stretched syllables.

Don’t narrow-minded metalheads care more about wanking guitar solos, rather than vocals? It’s not like Disturbed went full technical. There’s a grinding riff in the title track and bragging lyrics in “The Vengeful One”. At its heart, it’s a Nu Metal record. They just stripped Nu Metal of everything that made it fun. Just when you think you get a dance song in “You’re Mine”, Draiman comes in with all his humorlessness. That reminds me of that David Guetta song about being titanium. There’s no parking on the dancefloor and no seriousness in dance music. Stop that crap.

“Fire It Up” is the record’s most rotten apple. Draiman discovers marijuana. I’m happy for him, but musicians have worshipped weed from before Cypress Hill. Still, listening to that song will make you think smoking weed is a serious activity for serious people and that you’re not allowed to laugh while high. “When I fire it up, I feel like serenity is mine”? The verses make Draiman sounds like he’s nothing without weed.

Maybe that’s the problem. Disturbed ran out of ideas and so all they have is weed. Now, I’d be interested to hear a Disturbed album that’s all about smoking weed. “Fire It Up” has more life in it than anything here. Most of the album is typical anthems about nothing played with a straight face. There is Dark Ambient music with more fun than this. I have no idea how you can fuck up a song called “Who Taught You How to Hate” but that’s Disturbed for you.

1.5 vengeful ones out of 5

Bring Me the Horizon – That’s the Spirit

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Bring Me the Horizon are, what, the 3rd Metalcore act to abandon the genre for Nu Metal? It used to be the opposite.

The change Bring Me made is amazing. Linkin Park will be name-dropped in almost every review of this album and they should be. There is a similarity in sound, but what they both have in common is the desire to re-invent themselves. When this guy blasted songs from Sempiternal I was shocked at how different it was. When I blasted “Happy Song” a different guy was shocked it was the same band.

What is it in fame that causes some artists to fall apart, and others to aim high? It seems that with every new album, Bring Me are trying to justify their existence and popularity. They don’t try to justify it to people who dislike them because they’re not Iron Maiden. They know “Pray for Plagues” is barely worth being a demo. I still think the only reason it got popular is because of that porn sample in the end.

So That’s the Spirit is another reinvention, but it sounds necessary. It doesn’t sound like an exercise to impress anymore. Sykes talked about this being a concept album about depression. Now, whenever artist talk about their albums having a concept they tend to bullshit (even if the concept exists). Sykes’ statement isn’t complete bullshit, though. The album sounds way more sincere than anything like it.

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Speaking of depression…

The orignal Nu Metallers didn’t understood their emotions. They just vented them. That makes for great music to work out to, but there aren’t many songs to point to and say ‘this is sums up the feeling’. The revivalists had time contemplating their emotions while blasting Slipknot. Like Islander and My Ticket Home, Bring Me’s are more focused on a certain subject or emotion.

That’s how you get the brilliant “Happy Song”. The lyrics sum up the reason such loud music exist. We sing a little fucking louder and it doesn’t solve our problems, but it sure makes us feel better. Sykes sound desperate to break out of the depression in the chorus (Notice how he emphasizes the word ‘fucking’. It sounds necessary this time). Then he moves to subdued vocals, admitting that he has no idea what to do with the storm in his head. The song ends with a breakdown and Sykes screaming the album title like he knows it doesn’t help but it’s better than nothing. It’s a song about fighting the depression that still acknowledges we can’t really get rid of that storm

The album can easily be divided to songs that get close to the song, and those that get a little lost. Nothing here is outright bad, but sometimes the idea of moving to melodic Rock gets the better of them. It’s weird to hear “Happy Song”, “Throne” and “Oh No” next to “Run” and “What You Need”. The latter songs sound like B-Sides that got big hooks but no conceptual focus.

The band is talented enough to make these songs worth blasting. Sykes’ vocals deserve a praise. He clearly sounds like a vocalist who only discovered melody recently. There’s an aggressive edge to his voice. He doesn’t need the Deahtcore growls anymore. His vocals with the thundering vocals in “Happy Song” are enough to make it sound heavy as a really heavy thing.

On the more conceptual half, the band sounds unstoppable. You’ve heard songs like “Follow You” and “Throne” before, but not like this. There have been many empowering songs, but few like “Throne”. Like Islander’s “Counteract”, it doesn’t sound angry. Sykes sound pretty happy on the verses. Covering it as a happy Pop song should be easy. On the former he’s transformed to a wimp who can’t help being attracted to someone that’s bad for him. He performs the song with all the vulnerability and hopeless the subject deserves. It’s the complete opposite of “Throne”.

Some songs land right in the middle. There is a great fuck-off song buried somewhere in “True Friends”. The punchline sure sounds good over such loud guitars, but all the other lyrics sound like they were copied from songs by lesser bands. It’s hard to believe some people still write lines like “It fell apart/right from the start”. Some just sound like B-Side, like the aforementioned “Run”. Nothing in it makes you want to turn down the volume, but it lacks something special. It’s just a good Hard Rock hook.

Even if it couldn’t utilize its concept in all the songs, it’s still a great Nu Metal album. It’s the sound of a band who experimented a lot, and now want their songwriting to carry them. They use their sound to enhance already good hooks. Even if there’s a gap of quality between songs like “Oh No” and “What You Need”, everything is worth spinning at least five times. Let’s just hope Bring Me won’t pull a back-to-basics record. They have too much personality and melodic talent to churn another Deathcore record.

3.5 happy songs out of 5

My Ticket Home – To Create a Cure

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I was pretty sure Strangers Only was an attempt to bury this record. It also has screaming and singing, but it’s so determine to not be Metalcore. It’s vulgar. It has Hip-Hop rhythms. It crushes most Nu Metal and finds the best way to say ‘Bullshit’. Looking at this album’s title and their name, there’s no way this can be anything other than generic Metalcore that sounds big and that’s it, right?

“A New Breed” is a really good song. It thunders and the chorus is both melodic and aggressive. It uses big words to tell the world the lead singer is going to do whatever he wants (or so I think. You can’t really make sense of it). All is generic and ordinary in Metalcore-opolis until you get to “The Truth Changes if We Both Lie”. The melody is really good. The musicianship sounds as epic as it should and there’s no screaming.

My Ticket Home aren’t really trying to make metalcore. They listened to the bands, noticed what they’re trying to achieve and aimed for that. Metalcore, with its breakdowns, serious attitude and poetic, nonsensical lyrics can be good at sounding epic and big. It may not end up as meaningful as Neon Genesis Evangelion, but it sure makes you want to rewatch it with it blasting in the background.

So the band’s aim is not to provide breakdowns and catchy hooks. It’s to provide an epic atmosphere, and they add what suits it and leave out what doesn’t. It works on “A New Breed”, but if they’ll have to only use clean vocals (“The Truth Changes”) or those atmospheric guitar lines Screamo bands like (the beginning of “Beyond”) they’ll use it.

In a way, this brings My Ticket Home closer to the overblown Post-Hardcore of A Skylit Drive and Hopesfall. They don’t go their fully. They lack the quirks and the spontaneity. These bands had big fun with the structures. My Ticket Home stick closer to the traditional thundering guitars and stadium melodies. Their softer moments sound like they took a soft from a Metalcore song and extended, which is great.

This approach makes this one of the more interesting Metalcore records around. It makes me wonder why I haven’t bothered with the genre more. It only backfires on them on the aggressive track. Aggression needs chugging riffs they can ride. They need a steady groove. After all, they exist for moshing or headbanging. “Beyond” and “Motion Sickness” aren’t sure whether they’re Pianos Become the Teeth or Parkway Drive. The band doesn’t decide. It doesn’t stick to the melodies buried under aggression of Pianos, and it doesn’t want to just slam like Parkway Drive. The result is just a lot of noise.

Melody is the dominating force here, and it always sounds like the big budget film Hollywood will never make because they’re too stupid. The lyrics can be nonsense – “How can you heal if you don’t have any scars?” but Sean sings them like they’re the culmination of a lifetime. They’re also less loyal to the structure. Most Metalcore bands keep the screaming in the verses and the singing in the chorus, but the band puts everything everywhere. It’s an approach that’s more reminiscent of Nu Metal. It’s no surprise they went there eventually.

This almost makes me wish they’d continue this path. Metalcore is rarely interesting. Either the bands lean closer to Post-Hardcore (A Skylit Drive) or they’re Trancecore (I See Stars). Anyone else tends to sound like a Nu Metal without the fun factor. Just listen to Of Mice & Men’s terrible first album. Then again, the slightly different approach hints at the brilliance in Strangers Only. Although that one is the better record, this is still worth hearing if you have a tolerance for Metalcore.

3 cures out of 5

Black Sabbath – Paranoid

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I avoided this album for a long time on purpose. All the metalheads I knew were the most boring people to discuss music with. People whose musical world consists of Ed Sheeran, Rihanna and Coldplay are much better. At least they wouldn’t be afraid of the occasional bass drop or rap verse. Metalheads were so dull, generic and stupid that I couldn’t imagine their music to be any good. Dull, generic and stupid people probably listen to dull, generic, and stupid music.

It’s a hard album to avoid though. It haunted me like whatever’s haunting the protagonist in the title-track. It’s especially hard when you’re into Stoner Rock, and consider Monster Magnet to be one of rock’s greatest achievements. Eventually, I caved in and wondered why no one told me about how this record sounds sooner.

It sounds as influential as you heard it is. If you’re into the slower genres, its influence is more apparent. More than the birth of Heavy Metal, it sounds like the birth of Stoner. Sneak “Electric Funeral” in a playlist full of Electric Wizard, Sixy Watt Shaman and Kyuss and no one would notice the band playing it is from the 70’s. What’s far more interesting though, is that it doesn’t sound like a heavy metal record at all.

After playing some doomy riffs, Ozzy sings with that very familiar way of stretching syllables. I completely forgot that between the verses there are distorted guitars. By the time they turn it down again and Ozzy does his thing, I had to admit this doesn’t have that much to do with Heavy Metal. Paranoid is, at its heart, an American Folk record. It owes more to Dock Boggs and Blind Willie than anything. It’s a reinterpartation of the genre.

The reason it still sounds as brilliant today – aside from containing great melodies – is that Sabbath understood their source material better than anyone else. Death was a day-to-day reality in the Old Weird, but try to listen to “Oh, Death” again. It’s such a different era. It sounds alien and scary. Folk music wasn’t easygoing, but looked at tough subject matters in the eye.

Led Zeppelin tried to made a theater of it all. They tried to make big, loud music out of a genre that gained its strength from a banjo pluck and one powerful line. They worked against the style they’re interpartating. They turned up the volume and exaggerated everything, but it never had the emotional punch.

Sabbath knew that Folk Music was very dark. All they did was enhance the darkness with distortion, and some drums. How different is “Hand of Doom”’s lyrics to Dock Boggs’ “Oh, Death” or “Country Blues”? Ozzy may have been more opaque and updated his subject matter to nuclear apoclypse and sci-fi, but he didn’t work against the genre. The addiction he talks of in “Hand of Doom” is the same alcoholism folk singers been singing about. The title-track has a higher tempo, but the lyrics are the same thing as “Man of Constant Sorrow”.

Even “Planet Caravan” fits the concept. It’s weird and sparse, which is how folk music sounds like today. The Old Weird now looks like an alien planet to us, so actually singing about space travel makes sense. It’s far more deserving to be called Space Rock than anything by Pink Floyd. Pink Floyd’s songs sounded like they had space, but didn’t express what outer space felt like. Leaving planet Earth must be a pretty intense emotional experience. “Planet Caravan” has the wonder, the loneliness and the vastness of space in one song. The vocal effects are a brilliant touch.

People who are into guitars probably already own this. It will be forever considered a pioneering Heavy Metal record, but it will also always stand above the genre. Is there any follower of Black Sabbath that tried to replicate this album’s purpose? Most bands borrowed Black Sabbath’s noise and darkness. None of them were familiar with folk music and why it works, not even bands from that era. Even Monster Magnet, one of the greatest rock bands ever took a very different direction.

4 paranoids out of 5