Knife Party – Abandon Ship

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There are two ways to view this album, both of which are related. There’s an attempt to follow the blueprint for every good dance album. Artists that follow this blueprint make sure that first and foremost their tracks bang, and then surround them with quirks and amusing ideas to make them memorable. There’s also an attempt at a statement-making album. Knife Party tells us they are beyond the Bass Music scene. Why would they try to go beyond it is a mystery. It’s a scene that spawned LAXX, Skrillex, Excision, MUST DIE! and Barely Alive. Unlike the bland European house that Knife Party borrows from them a bit, Bass Music artists actually understand how dance music works.

Either way, this statement is a failure. Knife Party’s version of being ‘experimental’ is merely avoiding Brostep. Many of the ideas they replace the Brostep with are not only less original, but are not worth exploring. “Red Dawn” relies on a Middle Eastern melody, and this one-note idea makes it sound like a DJ tool by some Martin Garrix clone. The melodic “Kaledioscope” is just a less progressive Orbital, and “Begin Again” is Hardwell or Avicii with better vocals. “EDM Trend Machine” doesn’t add anything to the modern Deep House formula. The snippet of Brostep and Big Room before the drop doesn’t change much. It’s barely a second, so it doesn’t leave any effect. This idea was later improved on by Getter’s “Dubstep Is Dead”, who used this structure much more effectively. He also added a Hardstyle drop.

Another problem with these songs is that Knife Party operates in an area they don’t feel comfortable with and show little understanding of it. “Going soft” seems radical for an artist as aggressive as Knife Party, but the aggressive tracks sound much more inspired. It makes you wonder if Rob Swire only churned “Kaledioscope” just to say that he can do more than make noise, but why would he avoid making loud noises if this is where he’s most inspired? “404”, “Micropenis” and “Boss Mode” are just as aggressive as anything by Excision, and this time the quirks actually work. There’s a chiptune breakdown in the middle of “Micropenis” that sounds jarring at first, but actually fits in such overblown music. “Boss Mode” is a Drumstep track masquerading as Twerk. “404” is pure mayhem. The melodic build-up is the only thing stable about. Error sounds, glitches and a Big Room drop that takes the genre to its extreme. Even their attempt at Disco in “Superstar” sounds like they added a little funk to “404” instead of borrowing their ideas from Daft Punk. Disco never had such hard drums.

Rob SWire’s attempts at originality failed, but it barely harms the quality of Abandon Ship. As a dance album, it’s fantastic. Every single track here is a banger. The aggressive tracks are much stronger than the softer ones, but even the soft ones are good enough to not let the album down. It’s a testament to Knife Party’s talents that “Begin Again” is as a good as it is. Give it to Hardwell or Avicii or Armin Van Something, and you’d get white noise. In the hands of Knife Party, this style of melodic house sounds like it has a future. It’s not just Rob’s vocals. When the drop comes, it’s focused more on an uplifting atmosphere, and it doesn’t rely just on its drop anyway. The drop in “EDM Trend Machine” is being done to death, but there’s still a great bassline there. Only “D.I.M.H.” is bad. It’s a bland, melodic track that is supposed to be ‘traditional’. If it is, I’m glad Leftfield and Underworld destroyed that trash. There’s no way the people behind “Give It Up” made such a shoddy production job.

Once you get over the pretense that this album is more original than its peers, it’s a great dance album that gets everything right. Knife Party’s transition to album should’ve come earlier. Abandon Ship actually feels too small. It could definitely use a few more tracks, perhaps an actual drum and bass one or another moombahton. Despite Rob Swire’s attempt, Abandon Ship belongs to the Bass Music section and another example of how exciting and underrated that genre is. Just forget about “D.I.M.H.”.

3.5 abandoned ships out of 5

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Avicii – True

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Despite putting a lot of effort into fighting against White People in the name of anti-racism, silly SJW’s forgot one crucial, undeniable fact about White People. White People can’t dance.

That’s not true. There are plenty of white musicians who made great dance music. Listening to True, though, makes you take that statement seriously. It has nothing to do with the so-called ‘country’ influence. In fact, Avicii fails to understand that genre, too. Is that cultural appropriation?

True doesn’t combine Country/Folk and EDM. In order to do that, Avicii would need an understanding of these genres, and to find a common ground between them. It can be hard with these genres, which are almost opposite. The difficulty is not an excuse for the lack of imagination.

“Wake Me Up” is a mash-up of acoustic guitars, typical serious lyrics about profound positive truths and a melodic drop, just in case Skrillex is too much for you. Most of the tracks are the same – the Adele-aping “Addicted to You” and “Hey Brother”.

As pop songs, they’re not too bad. Listening to them after people stopped blasting them from their phones, they’re actually pretty good. Avicii isn’t the songs’ strength, though. Whenever Avicii steps up to provide a melodic breakdown, he seems to be trying to combine beautiful melodies with the energy of Dada Life.

This doesn’t work. Dada Life get their energy from their aggressive, buzzing sound. Melody can accompny rhythm, but it can’t take its place. That’s the problem with Avicii. He thinks melody can lead a dance song, and that sticking an acoustic guitar makes your song country. It’s like a worse version of Anrew Huang’s 26 Genre Song.

It gets worse whenever Avicii doesn’t pretend to experiment. “Dear Boy” is stretched to seven minutes in an attempt to make us thing it’s progressive house. “You Make Me” is nonsense. “Hope There’s Someone” is a useless cover that also thinks there’s room for such seriousness at parties. At least, when attempting ‘Country’ Avicii had enough spark to attempt making a catchy melody. It was false experimentation, but Avicii believed he was stepping into something original. The more ordinary pop songs are Music For People Who Don’t Like Dance Music.

Only two songs here rise above everything, and oddly enough they come from the two styles. “Shame On Me” finally finds a bridge between Bluegrass and EDM, has the best melody on the album and a talk box. “Lay Me Down” is just a great pop song, and the only thing here that has a bassline.

Avicii became one of the most popular DJ’s because he delivers dance music that contains little of what makes it work, yet has all the apperance. There is a future for him, if he’s willing to give up making EDM and settle for Pop music. He does have a better touch with melody than other famous producers, but this isn’t the genre he should working in.

2 brothers out of 5