From Ashes to New – Day One

fromashestonew
There was bound to be a Linkin Park worshipping band some time. The only surprise is that it came this late. It’s been 12 years since the explosive success of Meteora, and only now a band tries to replicate its success?

Linkin Park had their share of similar bands, but they always took the most banal elements. Red and Hoobastank didn’t echo Linkin Park but echoed the whole Angst Rock movement that encompassed a variety of genres. A few others came close, like Thousand Foot Krutch. They were too fun and loose though. From Ashes to New literally worship it.

The only difference between Ashes and Linkin Park is in the rapping. It’s more aggressive, sounding leaning towards the wackier moments of Cage. Besides that, “Land of Make Believe” sounded like what the fans wanted and never got after Meteora. The rapping drives the verses and the beat fits the amount of bars – the band is clearly familiar with Hip-Hop. The chorus is melodic but full of hate and there’s some screaming to add punch. It’s all backed by electronic sounds.

It’s just as exciting as it was the first time Linkin Park did it. The weird criticism aimed at Linkin Park that they’re generic still doesn’t make sense. Later albums proved they were always about mixing things up, and the bands that truly sound like them have these same qualities. Just as it took time for Icon for Hire and Hollywood Undead to expand their genre, it will take to Ashes too.

Their sound is great, but it’s limited. Despite mixing genres, the songs themselves aren’t very different. Even the mood feels oddly the same, even though “Land of Make Believe” is supposed to be aggressive whereas “Downfall” is hopeful. It’s not enough to just borrow various ideas from various genres. You need to find a way to mix them up.

When Linkin Park realized this, we got Minutes to Midnight which had the pure Hip-Hop of “Bleed It Out” next to the electronic ballad of “Leave Out All the Rest”. It’s hard to find such odd moments here. There’s a quasi-bass drop in “Farther From Home” but it doesn’t really affect the song. In the end, every song is the same. Hooks are sung with complete serious, the drums and guitars thunder, the electronics tell you this is epic and someone occasionally raps.

The hooks can only carry them so far, although there are some brilliant ones – “Downfall”, “Land of Make Believe” and “Breaking Now” make you forget the obvious influence. If you have a uniform, you need brilliant hooks. It’s not that Ashes lack something specific that prevents them from writing good hooks. They sound passionate enough, and they never rely on annoying techniques of just stretching syllables. The science of a good chorus is a confusing one and the band isn’t an expert on it here.

There’s hope for them, though. They may be derivative, but they’re derivative of a great band who later became greater. Even if they lack Linkin Park’s hooks, they got their wide-eyed approach. Being an experimental, genre-bending band is hard. It takes experience to learn about the genres, how they work and in how many ways you can mix them. The band gets the basics right, so the future looks bright for them.

3 ashes out of 5

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